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Source: Ansarullah Likely to Hit Saudi Warships after Resumption of Airstrikes

18 May 2015 17:54


Yemen’s Ansarullah movement is likely to attack the Saudi naval forces in reaction to the naval blockade imposed on the Yemeni people, sources said Monday.
The Saudi naval forces have imposed a naval blockade on Yemen in recent months, and Ansarullah is likely to attack those forces to remove the siege, an informed Yemeni source told Alwaght website on the condition of anonymity today.

The news comes two weeks after Yemeni sources said the country’s army backed by Ansarullah revolutionaries managed to thwart a massive Saudi air and navy-borne invasion of Aden shores, and captured the all members of a Saudi navy unit.

Saudi Arabia plans to keep the blockade to tighten the maritime trade with Yemen, specially at its Northern parts, and to impose chronic hunger on the Yemenis where they supply 90% of their needs from abroad, according to the website.

The Saudi naval blockade can lead to a naval war with Ansarullah, the report said, adding that the movement could wage massive operations against the Saudi naval forces that could extend to Bab al-Mandab strait.

The end of the Saudi land and sea blockade on Yemen could be one of the Ansarullah gains when the national dialogue start under the UN supervision.

Saudi Arabia launched its bombing campaign against Yemen on March 26 in an attempt to restore power to fugitive President Mansour Hadi, a staunch ally of Riyadh.

Hadi stepped down in January and refused to reconsider the decision despite calls by Ansarullah revolutionaries of the Houthi movement.

Despite Riyadh’s claims that it is bombing the positions of the Ansarullah fighters, Saudi warplanes are flattening residential areas and civilian infrastructures.

According to FNA tallies, the Monarchy’s attacks have so far claimed the lives of at least 3,812 civilians, mostly women and children.

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