Islamic Invitation Turkey
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Turk ISIL terrorist confirms non-disguised Turkish Government-Takfiri ties

19 June 2015 13:20



A Turkish ISIL militant, recently captured by the Kurdish Peshmerga fighters, has confirmed the close connections between Ankara and the Takfiri terrorist group.

Huseyin Mustafa Peri, a Turkish national who was arrested by the Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG) in Syria earlier in June, stated that Ankara and the ISIL have close economic ties.

“A certain trade must be going on… There could be some kind of a fuel or oil deal… or some sort of a water deal,” Peri said in an interview with the Al-Monitor website released on Thursday, adding that he could frequently “see Turkish goods in the Islamic State’s shops” during his stay at the Arab country.

The 25-year-old militant also touched upon ISIL’s attack on the Turkish consulate in the northern Iraqi city of Mosul in June last year, saying the Takfiri group released the 49 Turkish captives of the incident following a prisoner swap and “some sort of a trade deal” with the government in Ankara.

The photo shows Takfiri terrorists in the northwestern Syrian city of Aleppo on May 26, 2015. (© AFP)


Certain ISIL affiliates “imprisoned in Turkey were swapped … there was some sort of a trade deal or an oil deal in addition to the issue of the captives,” he noted, citing an ISIL commander.

Peri further revealed that the ISIL maintains a massive presence in Turkey, adding that there are several schools and community structures that advertise the Takfiri dogma in the Turkish cities of Konya and Gaziantep.

Some of these schools “used to support” the Justice and Development Party of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, he went on to say.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (© AFP)


The militant also said that the ISIL elements managed to easily carry him over the border to Syria, stressing that no Turkish security forces intercepted the terrorists’ convoy which also included “three or four Indonesians and three Uighurs.”

“I made the decision to come here (Syria) in late September and in early November, I was here,” he stated, noting that “Crossing is easy.”

He then joined a Turkish unit in the ranks of Takfiri terrorists after being brainwashed in an ISIL training center for a fortnight.

“The average age of the Turkish unit was 20-22. They were all young, quite young,” he said, adding that the unit was commanded by two brothers, with noms de guerre of Abu Osama al-Kurdi and Abdussalam, who were both from the Central Anatolia Region of Turkey.

Peri also referred to the terrible condition of women under ISIL’s reign of horror, saying the Takfiri ideology views women either as concubines or servants.

Displaced Iraqi women from the Izadi community, who fled the ISIL violence, gather around their tents at a refugee camp on Mount Sinjar on January 15, 2015. (© AFP)


“All women designated as non-Muslims are considered concubines… One can take concubines from the Shiites, the Alawites and the Yazidis (Izadis),” he noted, adding, “The concubines are kept in a house. There is a certain price for them. When someone wishes to have one, they could get a concubine or a captive in return for payment. She would be his servant.”

The militant further revealed that Takfiris consider as “spoils” of war the belongings of the people fleeing their homelands in fear of the ISIL violence.

The spoils “are divided into five … one portion would go to the Islamic State (ISIL) and the other four would be shared between us (Takfiri militants) in the unit…” he said, adding that the military commander of each unit, also known as the emir, “could decide to give the four portions to the Islamic State as well.”

Peri also hailed the kind attitude of Kurdish fighters after he was injured in clashes with the YPG in the Syrian town of Tell Hamis in the northeastern Hasakah Governorate.

The Kurdish fighters of the People’s Protection Units (YPG) sit in the back of a pick-up truck in the Syrian town of Tal Hamis, February 26, 2015. (© AFP)


“There was no torture after they caught me. For me, this was something really nice. It was not what I had imagined in my head. They took me directly to the hospital. They took care of my wound,” he went on to say.

The ISIL terrorist group, with the backing of many Western and regional states, started its campaign of terror in Syria in 2012.

The ISIL terrorists currently control areas across Syria as well as northern and western Iraq.

The Takfiri militants have been carrying out horrific acts of violence, including public decapitations, against Iraqi communities such as Shias, Sunnis, Kurds and Christians.

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