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Saudileaks: Envoy Asks Riyadh to Act to Stop Djibouti’s Tendency towards Iran

13 July 2015 17:51



The documents released by the Yemen Cyber Army after it hacked the Saudi Foreign Ministry in May showed Riyadh’s antagonistic efforts to fight back Iran’s growing clout in Djibouti.

The Saudi Foreign Ministry was hacked by the Yemen Cyber Army in May, and a copy of its information was sent to FNA and another one to the whistleblower website WikiLeaks.

According to one of these documents, the Saudi embassy in Djibouti in a letter to the foreign ministry advised it to adopt the necessary measures to trouble or stop Iran’s activities in Djibouti, fearing that Tehran’s actions might cause the spread of certain viewpoints in the African country that are not desired by Riyadh.

Also in the letter, the Saudi mission rejects the US claims about taking actions in Djibouti to uproot terrorism in Somali, saying only a strong government in Somalia can uproot terrorism and piracy in Somali waters and the Gulf of Aden.

The letter added that every country has its own plans and interests in Somalia which shows the African country’s strategic situation.

Late in May, the Yemen Cyber Army released a portion of the information and documents that it had gained in its recent cyber attack on Saudi Arabia’s Foreign, Interior and Defense Ministries.

The Yemen Cyber Army announced that it has hacked the website, servers and archives of Saudi Arabia’s Foreign, Interior and Defense ministries and would release thousands of these top secret documents.

The group claimed that it “has gained access to the Saudi Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MOFA) network and have full control over more than 3000 computers and servers, and thousands of users. We also have access to the emails, personal and secret information of hundreds of thousands of their staff and diplomats in different missions around the world”.

The hackers’ statement, which said the cyber army has also attacked the Saudi Interior and Defense ministries and vowed to release their details later, was carried by several globally known hackers websites.

Following the hack in May, the Yemen Cyber Army sent a copy of its information to FNA and another one to the whistleblower website WikiLeaks.

“WikiLeaks released over 60,000 documents on Friday and vowed to release the rest in coming weeks, but we plan to release the documents in separate news items since many of them contain the names of foreign nationals who have demanded visit to Saudi Arabia, for example for Hajj pilgrimage, and their names have been mentioned among the Saudi agents. Thus releasing the list of names and documents might hurt innocent individuals who have done nothing, but applied for visa at a Saudi embassy for doing Hajj pilgrimage,” FNA English Editor-in-Chief Seyed Mostafa Khoshcheshm said.

“The number of the documents is way beyond the 500,000 that has been announced by WikiLeaks, but they need to be checked first to make sure that they do not contain misleading information and are not harmful to innocent people,” he added.

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