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Cameron’s immediate ouster after EU vote gains momentum

5 June 2016 20:19



UK Prime Minister David Cameron is likely to step down the day after the upcoming referendum on Britain’s membership in the European Union (EU), a member of the British Parliament says, noting that more MPs are considering to join the Leave campaign.

Even if the Brexit campaign fails to prevail in the June 23 vote, Cameron’s government is not likely to clinch a victory by a margin bigger than 10 percent, the Daily Mirror reported Sunday.

“That would let him leave in a sensible fashion rather than the bloody mess that it could be,” a backbench MP was quoted as saying by the daily.

According to the report, at least 25 Tory MPs are totally committed to the Leave campaign and can give Cameron a hard time in the build-up to the vote. The number is expected to rise as the voting nears.

Last week Tory MPs Andrew Bridgen and Nadine Dorries said that the premier had effectively lost his parliamentary support after resorting to “lies” and “outrageous” claims in his bid to persuade British voters to back the Remain campaign.

Bridgen revealed that at least 50 MPs – the number needed to call a confidence vote – were on the ready to challenge Cameron’s leadership, adding that a vote on the prime minister’s future was “probably highly likely” after the referendum.

Plotters of Cameron’s ouster inside his own party name leading Tory MP David Davis, his rival in the last general election, as their leader.

“What’s ­important here isn’t the person holding the knife – it’s the person standing behind the person holding the knife,” a senior MP told Mirror. “That’s David Davis, who has not forgiven Cameron for beating him to the leadership.”

This is while Cameron has already pledged to step down before the next general election in 2020.

Boris Johnson, London’s former mayor, is currently the favorite to succeed Cameron into office but is expected to face stiff competition from fellow Brexit supporter Justice Secretary Michael Gove and Home Secretary Theresa May.

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