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Boston students protest Trump’s ‘harmful policies’

6 December 2016 10:10

election-protests-massachusetts

 

Nearly 300 US students in Boston, Massachusetts, have walked out of classes and marched to the City Hall to protest President-elect Donald Trump’s policy proposals.

Holding handwritten signs and shouting anti-Trump chants, about 285 students from local high schools and colleges, as well as other activists, staged a rally on Monday to protest the incoming president’s “harmful policies.”

Participants walked out of classes around 1 pm, and began gathering in the downtown area around 2 pm, with plans to march to the state Capitol, and then to City Hall, The Boston Globe reported.

“Donald J. Trump will be the next president of the United States and we have the right to protest and stand together against the inexcusable statements he has made about, and the harmful policies he promises to enact against immigrants, Muslims, black Americans, the disabled and women,” according to the Facebook event page.

Boston Mayor Marty Walsh has said he supports the students’ right to protest, but has urged them to stay in school.

“I just feel that the students have every right to express themselves and I support that,” he said. “I just think that during school hours—right now, this early in the year—I just don’t think it’s needed today. I think they can do it after school. I think there are ways of doing it.”

The students’ latest demonstration follows numerous protests in Boston following Trump’s election.

Large protests have erupted nationwide in response to Trump’s election victory following a contentious presidential campaign involving two of the least popular candidates in recent US history.

Trump won the US presidency despite extreme unpopularity among minorities, underscoring deep national divisions that have fuelled racial and political confrontations.

The New York businessman was elected to the White House with 8 percent of the black vote, 28 percent of the Hispanic vote and 27 percent of the Asian-American vote, according to a Reuters/Ipsos Election Day poll.

 

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