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Liberation of Aleppo means end of terrorists

13 December 2016 16:12

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The Syrian forces backed by Russian airstrikes are almost in the last phase of liberating the northern city of Aleppo. Damascus and its allies launched a major offensive to recapture the militant-held of the city nearly three weeks ago. Residents of Aleppo have taken to the streets to celebrate the imminent official announcement of the city’s full liberation from militants.   

Catherine Shakdam, with the Shafaqna Institute for Middle Eastern Studies from London, told Press TV’s Top 5 that the Syrian army backed by Russia’s air forces could resist foreign pressures and succeed in pushing back terrorists from Aleppo.

The liberation of Aleppo represents the end of Takfiri terrorists in the eyes of the Syrian people, because “they (the Syrians) have defeated the black flag army in their country,” Shakdam said on Tuesday.

She described the triumph in Aleppo as a “tremendous victory,” hoping that the “Daesh militants will run away and go back to where they came from.”

She went on to say that “this victory is not just against the radicalism of Wahhabism, but it is for the people of Syria, [because] it is a victory for democracy, for freedom and for dignity, and it is confirmation that resistance works.”

According to the commentator, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad “will be remembered as the man who actually stood up against Daesh” and said no.

Syria is consolidating its hold on Aleppo while Damascus has been under pressure from Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Qatar and so many other countries, which resorted to humanitarian issues to stop the military operation in the eastern Aleppo in order to save the lives of militants, she noted.

Slamming the Saudi kingdom for pumping up Wahhabist and Takfiri ideology in the Middle East and especially in Syria, she said, “If Saudi Arabia is so in love with Wahhabism; then keep it, keep it within your border, [because] we don’t want it, we reject it.”

Syria has been the scene of violent clashes since March 2011, when foreign-backed militants launched their attacks to wreak havoc in the Arab country.

 

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