BahrainIslamic Awakening

Bahraini Movement Calls for Civil Disobedience on Anniversary of Revolution

13921119000373_PhotoIThe ‘Bahrain 14 February Revolution Friends’ movement called on all people in the tiny Persian Gulf island to join strikes and civil disobedience to express their opposition to the Saudi occupying forces and demand establishment of democracy and freedom on the threshold of the third anniversary of their revolution.
“The Bahrain 14 February Revolution Friends urges all the revolutionary people, specially freedom-seeking and resistant women, to participate in the general civil disobedience and strike to be practiced on February 13-15,” a statement by the movement said on Saturday.

The statement underlined that the hospitals and medical centers are exception to the appeal.

As the al-Khalifa regime is in fragile conditions and seeks to put an immediate end to the protests, all the revolutionary people should display their anger in the streets on the anniversary of Bahrain revolution, it stressed.

Since 2011, anti-regime demonstrations have been held almost every day in Bahrain.

On March 14, 2011, troops from Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates were called in to assist the Bahraini regime in its crackdown on peaceful protesters. According to local sources, scores of people have been killed and hundreds have been arrested.

International human rights organizations have repeatedly slammed the Manama regime for excessive use of force against peaceful protests.

On Wednesday, Bahrainis were in the streets again demonstrating against the ruling Al Khalifa regime.

Anti-regime demonstrations were held in the Northeastern island of Sitra and in the Western village of Shahrakan.

Protesters also expressed solidarity with imprisoned protesters and pledged to continue demonstrations until their constitutional rights are restored and justice prevails.

The demonstrations come despite a new law imposing prison terms and fines for those who publicly ‘insult’ Bahrain’s King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa.

The new law, which has been announced ahead of the third anniversary of the country’s 2011 popular uprising against the Al Khalifa regime, stipulates that “publicly offending the king of Bahrain, its national flag or emblem” will carry a sentence of minimum one year and maximum seven years, as well as a fine of up to $26,000.

Back to top button
Close