IranMiddle East

Defense Minister Lauds Military Equipment Manufacturing under Sanctions

Iranian Defense Minister Brigadier General Amir Hatami praised the efforts of young experts of his country’s defense industry who managed to achieve know-how for manufacturing advanced military batteries in the time of sanctions.

“With strong will and round-the-clock efforts of young experts and genius people in the defense industry’s Energy Sources Development Organization, we are inaugurating the production line for advanced military batteries,” Brigadier General Hatami said this morning, in the opening ceremony of the production line.

The military official lauded the achievement against the backdrop of the US unilateral sanctions.

He added that with his country acquiring the know-hows of advanced and modern military batteries, the country will be able to offer superior logistical support in areas of field, aerial, marine, radar and electronic combats

The Iranian military officials have on several occasions said that the country’s advances in building different military equipment are merely aimed at defending the country against any possible aggression.

In relevant remarks in May, General Sabahi Fard underscored high power of the country’s radar and missile systems, warning of a crushing response to possible threats.

He stressed that the country enjoyed integrated missile and radar systems, saying the Army constantly monitored threats on land, air and sea so that if the enemy wanted to take any action, it would face a firm and crushing response.

He said that the Iranian Armed Forces were using all capacities, including good training, to promote their power against all possible challenges.

Last week, India’s Defense Minister Rajnath Singh, in a meeting with Iranian Ambassador to India Ali Chegeni, reiterated that New Delhi is determined to further expand defense and military cooperation with Tehran.

Late in July, reports emerged that India was impressed by Iran’s defensive capabilities which led to the downing of an American spy drone in the Strait of Hormuz.

Downing of the US Global Hawk drone by Iran in the Persian Gulf prompted a rethink within the Indian military establishment, led by the air force, over the acquisition of American-made armed drones on account of their cost and questions over their survivability.

India’s three services had planned to buy 30 drones from the United States at a cost of $6 billion. The plans were for the air force and the army to acquire 10 Predator-B drones each and the navy to buy long-distance surveillance versions.

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