Middle EastPalestine

Hamas urges Intl. community to turn words into actions to end Israeli occupation

The Palestinian resistance movement, Hamas, has called on the international community to turn its slogans of solidarity with Palestinians into actions to put an end to the decades-long Israeli occupation of their land and enable them to live a dignified life.

In a written statement on Sunday, Hamas spokesman Abdul-Latif al-Qanu made the call, marking the International Day of Solidarity with the People of Palestine, which is celebrated annually on November 29.

The occasion is a UN-organized observance to remind the world of the Palestinian people’s just cause and legitimate rights. It is commemorated worldwide, with officials expressing their support for the Palestinian cause and denouncing the Israeli conduct in the occupied lands.

“Our people’s oppression and daily suffering as a result of occupation and siege should be a constant reminder,” the spokesman of the Gaza-based resistance group further said, the Palestinian Information Center reported.

He added that the International Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People has been assigned to remind the world of the Palestinian people’s just cause and legitimate rights.

Gaza has been under Israel’s land, air and sea blockade since 2006, with the international community consistently demanding Israel to end it.

In 1977, the UN General Assembly called for the annual observance. It marks the day in 1947 when the UN General Assembly adopted the Palestine partition resolution 181.

More than 600,000 Israelis live in over 230 illegal settlements built since the 1967 Israeli occupation of the Palestinian territories of the West Bank and East Jerusalem al-Quds.

Israel occupied the West Bank and East Jerusalem al-Quds during the Six-Day War in 1967. It later annexed East Jerusalem al-Quds in a move not recognized by the international community.

Palestinian officials say they want the resolution of the conflict with Tel Aviv based on the so-called two-state solution along pre-1967 boundaries.

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