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Turkish people gave it a 4.9 grade, one of the lowest scores in the OECD, where average life satisfaction is of 6.6

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Happiness or subjective well-being can be measured in terms of life satisfaction, the presence of positive experiences and feelings, and the absence of negative experiences and feelings. Such measures, while subjective, are a useful complement to objective data to compare the quality of life across countries.

Life satisfaction measures how people evaluate their life as a whole rather than their current feelings. It captures a reflective assessment of which life circumstances and conditions are important for subjective well-being. When asked to rate their general satisfaction with life on a scale from 0 to 10, Turkish people gave it a 4.9 grade, one of the lowest scores in the OECD, where average life satisfaction is of 6.6.

There is little difference in life satisfaction levels between men and women across OECD countries. In Turkey, however, women reported being somewhat happier than men, rating their lives at 5.1, compared with 4.7 for men. Education levels also influence subjective well-being. Whereas Turkish people who have only completed primary education have a life satisfaction level of 4.4, this score reaches 5.8 for those with tertiary education.

Happiness, or subjective well-being, is also measured by the presence of positive experiences and feelings, and/or the absence of negative experiences and feelings. In Turkey 61% of people reported having more positive experiences in an average day (feelings of rest, pride in accomplishment, enjoyment, etc.) than negative ones (pain, worry, sadness, boredom, etc.). This figure is lower than the OECD average of 76% and one of the lowest in the OECD.

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source: OECD offical site

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