Lebanon

Defeat Me .. Defeat Me Not


During the July war, Hezbollah stepped up the art of guerrilla warfare to the extent that his operations had the impact of disaster on the Zionist political and military echelons, as well as on that of Washington and its allies.

Decision-making capitals were in a state of severe shock. They looked like those who lost the ability to distinguish what is going on around them, and remained adhere to a language that belongs to a bygone era, the era that preceded the “Zari’t and the True Promise,” i.e. the era of the Zionist superiority which Hezbollah poured down sand on it.

After the Zionist unilateral withdrawal from South Lebanon in May 2000, Hezbollah Secretary General delivered the speech of victory in the southern town of Bent Jbeil in front of a joyful audience of the loyal Lebanese people:

“Every prisoner in Israeli jails will soon, God willing, be back home among you. Barak and his government have no choice: I advice him to leave the Shebaa farms… he has no other choice… I tell you: the Israel that owns nuclear weapons and has the strongest air force in the region is weaker than a spider’s web,” Sayyed Nasrallah said at that day.

Since then, the priority of the Zionist entity of occupation became the war of awareness in its fight against Lebanon. The spider web started to be the main concept on which Zionist army psychologists worked.

During the ground invasion of Lebanon in July 2006, the elite units adopted the name of “Webs of Steel Operation” for the Battle of Bent Jbeil in response to Sayyed Nasrallah’s speech of 2000. This new war finally presented an opportunity to retaliate for the “spider web”.

Senior Zionist officers, such as Chief of Staff Dan Halutz and Chief of Operations Gadi Eisenkot claimed that Bint Jbeil was an important “symbol”. They dreamed of capturing the town and bringing a Zionist leader to hold a victory speech at the same place where Sayyed Nasrallah held his speech in 2000. Instead, their dream vanished with the Mujahedeen hits, and according to the Zionist journalist Amir Rapaport, Bint Jbeil came to symbolize failure.

Zionist research centers estimated that Bint Jbeil and neighborhood village of Aynata was defended by 100-140 Hezbollah fighters, where the primary aim of the Hezbollah forces in the string of positions along the border was not to hold territory but to bleed the invaders and slow down their advance.

The operation was planned as a movement of pliers with the Golani Brigade and the Paratroopers Brigade, and the northern side of the town was intentionally left open to provide an escape route for the town’s defenders. Instead Hezbollah’s Mujahedeen used the opportunity to send in reinforcements to the town.

The battle started on July 24 and lasted till 29. The enemy inflicted heavy losses on the first day, where five Golani soldiers were wounded, and two tanks were sent to evacuate them. The first was hit by a missile, killing the platoon commander and wounding two of the crewmen. The second tank, a Merkava IV, ran over a powerful remote-controlled mine and rolled over from the blast. One of the crew was killed and the battalion commander, Lt.-Col. Guy Kabili, was wounded. An armor-plated D-9 bulldozer that attempted to rescue the casualties was forced to retreat after being hit by a missile. The wounded were finally evacuated under the cover of a smoke-screen. Another 13 soldiers were wounded in clashes with the blessed Mujahedeen.

“The town is in our control,” Brigadier General Gal Hirsch of the 91st Division – who wanted to conquer Bint Jbeil, not just to raid it – said by the next day declaring victory to the press, despite that the invaders had taken up positions outside Bint Jbeil and the nearby village of Aynata. “The work is almost completed and the terrorists are fleeing.” The statement would quickly prove disastrously wrong.

In a moment of clarity, a Zionist soldier described later his feelings when hearing Hirsch’s words over the radio, while being under Sagger missile attack “from every direction” in the town: “you realize something is wrong.”

Sporadic clashes continued over the next days. On July 29, a major engagement took place between Zionist paratroopers operating in the area and elite fighters from Hezbollah’s special force.

On the same day, the Zionist army of occupation pulled its troops from Bint Jbeil, declaring defeat and humiliation, and confirming the quote of Sayyed Nasrallah: “Israel is weaker than a spider’s web.”

As a result of their defeat in 2006, Zionist soldiers took pictures next to a memorial statute of Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah, which confirmed their acceptance of defeat and the lack of access to any scene showing their superiority over Al-Mujahedeen.

According to Fars news agency correspondent to Beirut, July war 2006 was a completely different experience for the Zionist army because any of its soldiers couldn’t take any picture next to devastation parameters occurred within the fighting zone. This forced the enemy to collect Hezbollah rockets that fell over the occupied Palestinian territory to allow settlers take notice of them.

However, the report said, the settlers didn’t welcome the exhibition for it reminded them of the humiliation they suffered throughout the war imposed on Lebanon for more than a month, where they had to resort to shelters for days and nights.

The enemy’s bitter experience in Lebanon of 2006 proves that neither military readiness nor over self-confidence can help in achieving victory over the faithful Mujahedeen.

From now on, poor soldiers of the so-called ‘Israel’ will have no other choice than believing in the inevitable destiny of their fabricated entity. Sooner or later, the spider’s web will be wiped out off the world map.

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