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Iran denies inviting Syrian opposition

Iran’s embassy in Damascus has refuted the unfounded claim that Tehran has invited Syria’s opposition leaders to hold a meeting on the situation in the Arab nation.

The Islamic Republic has never sought to invite the opposition [in Syria] or to consult and hold talks with those groups, Mehr News Agency quoted a statement released by the Iranian embassy on Wednesday.

The statement also emphasized that in case Tehran takes such a decision, it will definitely coordinate with the Syrian officials beforehand.

While the opposition and Western countries accuse Syrian security forces of being behind the killings, Damascus blames what it describes as outlaws, saboteurs and armed terrorist groups for the deadly violence, stressing that the unrest is being orchestrated from abroad.

Syrian opposition groups have also been interviewing israeli news outlets over the past few months. The interviews clearly show the opposition’s vision for the future of Syria, and indicate their interest in developing relations with Tel Aviv. 

Meanwhile, the confession of Syrian rebels to carry out armed activities and killing people as well as security forces proves that recent developments in the country are to be seen as parts of an attempt to start a revolt in order to overthrow the current government and replace it with a US-backed regime. 

However, the resolution adopted by the Arab League against Syria has increased the unity of Syrian people. Figures show that during the past weeks, nearly 12 million people have demonstrated in support of President Assad.

On Saturday, November 12, the Arab League voted to suspend Syria until after the peace plan proposed by the Arab body and accepted by Damascus on November 2, 2011 has been implemented by the Syrian government.

The plan urges all the parties to stop violence against the Syrian citizens, and also calls on the government to release those who were arrested during the unrest and to withdraw its armed vehicles from the residential areas.

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